COURAGE, ENDURANCE, MATESHIP AND SACRIFICE, COMPRESSION SOCKS AND ELECTOLYTE GELS

The firm has been involved in the Kokoda Challenge for two years now.

It is a great cause, fundraising for the Kokoda Challenge Youth Program. The Program supports young Australians, delivering key programs and opportunities to youth from all social backgrounds and targeting many different needs.
The program teaches kids discipline, structure and boundaries based on the “Kokoda Spirit” which embodies courage, endurance, mate ship and sacrifice – principles which take their origin from the Australian soldiers who fought on the Kokoda Track in WWII in 1942.

My Grandfather James William Buckley was part of the Kokoda Track Campaign in WWII fighting Japanese forces who were attempting to advance through the mountains of the Owen Stanley Range to seize Port Moresby as part of a strategy of isolating Australia from the US.

Like a lot of diggers who returned home from War, my Grandfather’s experiences in WWII had a very significant and adverse impact on him both physically and psychologically. Unfortunately these impacts were also felt most acutely by his wife and 11 children. Perhaps with a diagnosis and medical and therapeutic intervention his life after the war may have told a different story.

I think to have something so positive as the Kokoda Challenge Youth Program come out of the experience of the Aussie soldiers in PNG is a fitting legacy. It also provides various groups and teams who committed to doing the walk an opportunity to step outside their comfort zone.

BWB have embodied the Kokoda spirit in:

1. Ben O’Neill’s sacrifice in 2014 of leaving his team to help carry a stranger from another team back up the Crebra Trail, after that person had rolled his ankle.

2. Courtney Stewart’s pushing her teammates to run the last kilometre in order to cross the line before a team from another law firm;

3. Zoe Adam’s courage when she injured her knee at the ten kilometre mark – finishing the final 20km with the assistance of paracetamol, caffeine, sugar and willpower;

4. Neal Wood’s act of mateship carrying Zoe’s backpack for 20km, following her knee injury. Also, Neal’s commitment in ensuring we all finished the second leg of the 15km loop. (It is rumoured that one of his team members suggested they call it quits and go for an early coffee and a bacon and egg burger…….)

5. In 2015, following some heavy rains, the amount of mud that covered the track made some of the areas look distinctly Kokoda-esque.

To borrow from the All Blacks Rugby Union team’s management, who suggested that ‘Better People make Better All Blacks’, we’re proud to say of the Best Wilson Buckley Family Law team that ‘Better People make Better Family Lawyers’.

We’re looking forward to lacing up for the Kokoda Challenge in 2016!